Tag Archive | university

the “c” word

cword

That’s right, ladies and gentlemen. College.

I’ve been doing a lot of thinking lately about whether or not I want to go. Obviously my parents want me to. The hard part is trying to factor in whether or not that really matters to me. You see, I want to be a dancer, there’s no mistake about that. The question is, how do I get there? I don’t want to be a ballerina. Contemporary and commercial dance are where my heart’s at. I don’t necessarily need to go to college to be able to do those, I just think my parents believe that all successful roads in life start with university.

The problem, part two: I don’t want to waste the first four years of my adulthood, when I could be joining a company/agency or getting better training and seeing the world (London, specifically), trapped taking jazz and working towards a useless bachelor’s degree. I wanna do exciting things and meet exciting people. I want to dance.

Some of my friends’ life goals look like this: graduate high school, go to college and get a meaningless degree, and maybe work a little bit before marrying a dude and raising his family. I’d rather not. I have ambitions. Every day college starts to seem less like an achievement to aspire towards and more like a roadblock on the path to what I really want to do. I’m in the eleventh grade and the reason for everything I do nowadays has been reduced to “It’ll look good on your transcript.”

I overheard a conversation between a friend and his mother when they were the car yesterday. He told her that he didn’t want to go to uni because voice acting was the career he was after, which made college somewhat unnecessary. His mother said to him, “Will you feel the same way when you can’t feed your own family?” and that swiftly ended the conversation. Tense silence in the car.

Our parents just want the best for us. But I’m not ready to dedicate more anxiety, time, and money thinking about something that will determine the course of my adulthood. It’s too big for sixteen. I just want to dance honestly.

— Bethany.

I Know What I’m Doing, Really.

winterlondon.jpgWell, sort of.

Lo and behold, it’s Krysta again. It recently occurred to me that I haven’t explained what I want to do overseas. Now I know it’s been stated that I’m the theatre major of the group–if we haven’t stated that, now we have–but there are quite a few details missing from that statement.

For example, very few of all acting gigs pay well enough to support one’s self (and her companions). Aside from blockbuster movie/TV/Broadway stars, only big theatre companies make enough to consistently pay their actors. It’s no wonder so many actors get crazy–you have to fight a lot of dreamers to get a job. Not only that, but you have to look a certain way. That means talent alone can’t get you a great job.

Now I know you all must’ve heard this before–it isn’t new information to me, either–but it’s just that this is all dawning on me very suddenly. It’s one thing to hear this information over and over again, but it’s another to face the facts as an aspiring actress. What puts me two steps (because one is not enough) ahead of the game? What makes me stand out?

And that’s when I knew I had to study theatre. I’ve been in multiple plays and played almost every improv game in the book, but learning from the best of the best is what’s going to separate me from the competition. That’s going to launch my future career. That is what’s going to help me be the best (and trust me, you need to be the best in this business).

I’m sure some of you are wondering why I don’t sound like I’m relying on a “normal” job for the time being. It’s partially because I get bored easily of things I don’t enjoy, and I don’t enjoy “normal” forms of making money. And I know a job isn’t for fun, but I have trouble with sticking to things I can’t stand. There’s no way to say, “I didn’t do as I was told because it was too boring” to your employer without getting in trouble. Now I have my nannying job (and will soon have another one, I hope), but that can only last so long. I mean, once we head to England, I obviously have to get a new job. As if it wasn’t hard enough just getting my first one….

So to recap, I have to get more jobs, go to theatre school, learn a lot, kick butt at auditions, become the Doctor’s companion as soon as possible, make enough to support self and friends. Simple.

I’ve got this.

~Krysta

Hashtag Working Girl/You’ve Got to Have a J-O-B

Hello, everyone, it’s Krysta again. I’ve fallen behind in my posts meaning I’ve got quite a bit of news to tell you about, so it’s story time. Gather around, my lovelies….

So you know how people usually start college the fall after they graduate?

Yeah, that might not be happening this time.

Thanks to one of the bumps on the rollercoaster that is my life, I missed the opportunity to start college on time this year. Now before you start “le gasping”, let me assure you I’m still going to college. Maybe I’ll start mid-fall, maybe I’ll start in January, I don’t know right now. But I do know that I’ll be paying for my education myself because my parents can’t do it all themselves. After all, I have five other siblings who need their attention and, frankly, their funds. That means I have to start working ASAP because apparently universities don’t accept Monopoly money.

Which brings me to my next point: a job. Now a few weeks ago, I’d been thinking about just working at a place like CVS or Wal-Mart, but then I got offered a nannying job by a friend who had just left said nannying position. Basically, a couple–I’ll call them the Stevenson couple–needs someone to watch daughter Stevenson (and the neighbors’ daughter) until Mr. Stevenson gets home from work. I’d actually have to pick them up from the bus stop (which is a foreign concept to a homeschooler) and take them to the Stevensons’ house. Now I won’t go into all the details of the job, but my friend tells me the girls are both fans of One Direction, which means I already love these kids. The details have been all worked out and the family likes me enough, so I’ve officially got the job. This is amazing, considering my mom (who came with me) somehow managed to talk more than I did, making me seem shy and codependent. Nevertheless, I’m employed. Huzzah.

Unlike most people I know, I’m quite excited about having a job. And not only is this one relatively easy–I’m not Mary Poppins or anything, but I have a lot of experience with kids (raised/raising five siblings)–but it pays $75 a week, which is a lot when you’re always broke. I mean, that’s $300 a month…as in $300 more than I get now. (You can probably imagine how pumped I am about getting my first paycheck soon!)

But as you employed folk know, there is a downside to money–budgeting it. Now that’s something you can’t avoid–even if you really want to. I’ve been trying to come up with a good budget plan, but I don’t have one yet. So far, I’m thinking of just altering the suggestion Bethany gave me to make room for tithing by decreasing the amount needed for what we call “involuntary expenses”–things you consistently have to buy for yourself. Involuntary expenses are, as you know, not to be confused with that pair of shoes you just have to have, or the smoothies you’ve been craving for two weeks. Those are voluntary expenses and they’re in a very separate category.

Now most of you employed folk may know all about what I’m going to do here, but I encourage those of you who don’t to stick around and read this. Not to say that you have to follow this to a T, but looking at everyone else’s budget plans really helped me to develop my “prototype plan”, even before I needed one. I think it’s a good idea to see what works and what doesn’t and then try to make your budget plan to fit your life. So unless you’re way ahead and have already looked into budget plans (or have your own), here’s your starter package: my prototype plan. Now I’ll probably make some adjustments once I have a consistent cash flow (and another job), but I’m thinking of separating my paycheck into five parts:

  • savings- 65%,
  • short-term goals- 5%,
  • voluntary expenses- 5%,
  • involuntary expenses- 10%,
  • tithing- 10%, and
  • emergency funds- 5%

Savings is taking up more for me than it will for most of you, but that’s only because I have to meet the deadline before it’s time to fly across the pond. I hope you don’t feel pressured by this to save up more than half your paycheck. My short-term goals are just things I need or want a lot (e.g. my own laptop, a smartphone, new earbuds, etc.), preferably before we move to London. Voluntary expenses are just spur-of-the-moment things I want to buy–like a second dinner just because I’m out with my friends, or anything I want but don’t need that I haven’t saved up for. Tithing is what I put in the offering basket when I’m at church, mostly to support missions trips and other great things my church does for the community. Emergency funds are just what they sound like: money for emergency purposes only. I put that in italics because it’s important. I used to call everything an emergency and just spend $30 on food, which would be nice if I didn’t eat all of said food in only one sitting. (Talk about expensive taste. Ba-dum-tsss….)

So I think I’ve covered everything I wanted to cover (and then some). Sorry if you’re confused.

…Okay bye.

–Krysta

So Basically

Hey, everyone, Krysta here. (My first post, finally!)

Since I’m out of high school, my posts won’t be the same as Bethany’s or Maddie’s. I guess that’s one of the good parts of not being the same age, we’ll always have different things to say–especially because we’re so different as people.

So anyway, I think my first post is going to be about this conference I went to recently and how it’s related to moving to England, okay? Try to follow along, even if it makes no sense.

So I went to one of a series of conferences called Culture Shift organized by YWAM (Youth With A Mission) in mid-August. It was a lot of fun, more fun than I’d dared to hope it would be. It was also how I met a lot of really great people from outside this area–England included. (Do you see where this is going?)

One of the girls from England was named Hannah and the both of us got on really well, though I won’t pretend we became the best of friends or anything. She was liked that I knew a lot of British terms and admired my talent (among other things, I’m sure), and I liked that she was British and full of life (and funny stories). She gave me a lot of tips on studying in England and navigating the whole thing, which was really nice of her to do. In return, I didn’t refuse her when she asked me to sing something for her–a fair trade. (Don’t judge me.)

So the point is that somewhere between the prophesying and the evangelizing, she told me that Liverpool is one of the best places to study theatre because of all the cultures coexisting in that one area. So now I’m going to look into colleges in that area for the 2015-2016 school year. And here’s the best part: Hannah told me college is only six months out of the year. That means you get half a year in between semesters to do whatever you want (provided you save your money).

In conclusion, I’ve got friends in English places so I think we’ll be alright.
Sorry if this was confusing. Bye.

— Krysta